Follow by Email

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

IMF Cannot Quit Fiscal Consolidation (in Asian Surplus Countries) [feedly]

IMF Cannot Quit Fiscal Consolidation (in Asian Surplus Countries)
http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/2016/08/imf-cannot-quit-fiscal-consolidation-in-asian-surplus-countries.html

Brad Setser:

IMF Cannot Quit Fiscal Consolidation (in Asian Surplus Countries): In theory, the IMF now wants current account surplus countries to rely more heavily on fiscal stimulus and less on monetary stimulus.
This shift makes sense in a world marked by low interest rates, the risk that surplus countries will export liquidity traps to deficit economies, and concerns aboutcontagious secular stagnation. Fiscal expansion tends to lower the surplus of surplus countries and regions, while monetary expansion tends to increase surpluses.
And large external surpluses should be a concern in a world where imbalances in goods trade are once again quite large—though the goods surpluses now being chalked up in many Asian countries are partially offset by hard-to-track deficits in "intangibles" (to use an old term), notably China's ongoing deficit in investment income and its ever-rising and ever-harder-to-track deficit in tourism.
In practice, though, the Fund seems to be having trouble actually advocating fiscal expansion in any major economy with a current account surplus.
Best I can tell, the Fund is encouraging fiscal consolidation in China, Japan, and the eurozone. These economies have a combined GDP of close to $30 trillion. The Fund, by contrast, is, perhaps, willing to encourage a tiny bit of fiscal expansion in Sweden (though that isn't obvious from the 2015 staff report) and in Korea—countries with a combined GDP of $2 trillion.*
previously have noted that the Fund is advocating a 2017 fiscal consolidation for the eurozone, as the consolidation the Fund advocates in France, Italy, and Spain would overwhelm the modest fiscal expansion the Fund proposed in the Netherlands (Germany would remain on the fiscal sidelines per the IMF's recommendation).
The same seems to be true in East Asia's main surplus economies. ...
Bottom line: if the Fund wants fiscal expansion in surplus countries to drive external rebalancing and reduce current account surpluses, it actually has to be willing to encourage major countries with large external surpluses to do fiscal expansion. Finding limited fiscal space in Sweden and perhaps Korea won't do the trick. 20 or 30 basis points of fiscal expansion in small economies won't move the global needle. Not if China, Japan, and the eurozone all lack fiscal space and all need to consolidate over time.

 -- via my feedly newsfeed