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Friday, April 28, 2017

Congress should oppose Acosta’s confirmation and demand a pro-worker secretary of labor [feedly]

Congress should oppose Acosta's confirmation and demand a pro-worker secretary of labor
http://www.epi.org/blog/congress-should-oppose-acostas-confirmation-and-demand-a-pro-worker-secretary-of-labor/

Alexander Acosta will not be the secretary of labor that working people need, and for that reason, senators should oppose his confirmation. As Senator Elizabeth Warren said, the test is not whether Acosta is better than Andrew Puzder, a truly abysmal, insulting choice to lead the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL). The test must be whether he will be a strong advocate for working Americans, someone who will use the power of his department to improve their lives. The evidence from Acosta's confirmation hearings and his past service in the government shows that he will not. The best we might hope for is that he will not politicize the agency and will be a caretaker until an administration that believes in the Labor Department's mission is elected. That is not enough.

It isn't even clear that Acosta will be a good caretaker of the agency whose mission is to foster and promote the welfare of the nation's job seekers, wage earners, and retirees. At Acosta's confirmation hearing, Senator Maggie Hassan (D-NH) asked whether Acosta would defend the DOL against the draconian 21 percent budget cut called for in President Trump's preliminary budget. Acosta refused to say he would, despite professing concern about reducing the already tiny number of OSHA compliance officers in New Hampshire. Even Scott Pruitt, who spent years in state government attacking and suing the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) before his appointment as EPA administrator, cared enough about his mission to publicly oppose the EPA budget sent to Congress by Trump's Office of Management and Budget. DOL's Wage and Hour Division has fewer than 1000 inspectors for 7.3 million workplaces, and wage theft is a nationwide epidemic costing workers tens of billions of dollars a year. Yet Acosta would not commit to work to preserve the meager resources devoted to protecting workers from abuse.

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